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      Charleston police officer given Medal of Valor

      CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) -- A Charleston police officer involved in a chase and shooting last year was awarded the Medal of Valor this week.{}

      Charleston Police Officer Cory Goldstein was presented with the Charleston Police Department's Medal of Valor, one of the highest honors that can be given to an officer by the department.

      He was given the medal for the acts of heroism he displayed on March 30, 2013. The department issued this proclamation on Goldstein:

      About 10:30 p.m., Officer Goldstein observed a vehicle with a darkly tinted window infraction in the area of Ashley River Road and Tobias Gadsden Boulevard.{} He followed the car through the Citadel Mall parking lot, where it ran stop signs. The driver did the same thing in the parking lot of Best Buy at Sam Rittenberg Boulevard and DuPont Road. Officer Goldstein activated the blue lights on his cruiser and the driver stopped outside of the Best Buy. When Goldstein got out of his cruiser, the driver sped off.

      Goldstein followed the vehicle with his cruiser's blue lights and sirens on. He stopped following the vehicle after the driver turned off its headlights and ran a red light. Goldstein continued southbound on Savannah Highway and saw that the vehicle had crashed into a guard rail at the ramp to eastbound Interstate 526. The vehicle was disabled.

      Goldstein saw the driver running from the scene and he chased him. During the chase, the man turned and fired several shots at Goldstein, who was struck in the leg, arm, hand, and the chest area of his protective vest. Goldstein managed to return fire and struck the suspect several times.

      Goldstein maintained custody of the suspect until other officers arrived on scene.{}{}His actions in the face of imminent danger, and his courage to continue to engage to ensure the safety of not only himself, but responding officers, and the citizens of Charleston, reflect great credit upon himself, the Charleston Police Department, and the City of Charleston.

      It's awarded for an act of valor, most commonly found associated with a deadly encounter situation, which involves extreme risk of life to an officer, officers, or other person or persons and the act is selfless and noble in the endless pursuit of service and protection of the public to which they serve.

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