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      Holy City church survives sale, bid to buy

      By Eric Eganeegan@abcnews4.com

      CHARLESTON, SC (WCIV) -- A bid to sell a church that's stood on Wentworth Street since the 1830s and turn it into a private home was almost approved by Charleston's board of zoning and appeals.

      Tuesday, the final decision was taken out of the city's hands.

      The Redeemer Presbyterian Church has held service at St. Andrews Lutheran for more than five years. St. Andrews owns the church on Wentworth. The Redeemer congregation had been leasing the space. But a plan to sell it, so it can be turned into a home, a neighboring building into offices, put the sanctuary in jeopardy.

      "I think Charleston needs not only shells of buildings, but buildings that are alive with a vibrancy," said Redeemer Presbyterian assistant pastor, Sam Joyner.

      Joyner says his congregation is full of young families. They come to worship weekly with commitment and energy.

      "Doors open at 12 o'clock, and children bursting out, and music spilling out onto the street, people leaving here with hope in their eyes," Joyner said.

      City council was to rule on a decision made by the city's board of zoning that had nearly given the go-ahead for the church to be changed.

      "It's special to us, because we meet here every single week," Joyner said. "We have our children baptized, marriages occur, funerals occur."

      Businesswoman Nancy Snowden had offered to buy the property and renovate it. According to Redeemer, Snowden's bid was just south of $2 million. Snowden refused a request to comment for this report.

      Meantime, Redeemer Presbyterian was hopeful it could work out a way to stay at 43 Wentworth. The congregation did not have a plan B, had the sale gone through. But if they were forced to move, they'd be sure to carry on.

      "If he (God) wants to move us on, we'll believe his plan is big enough to include relocating, and he'll bless us there," Joyner said

      According to city council members, Tuesday, St. Andrews Lutheran and Redeemer Presbyterian agreed to negotiate a deal that would sell the church to Redeemer in the coming months.

      By Eric Egan

      eegan@abcnews4.com

      CHARLESTON, SC (WCIV) -- A Holy City church that's stood on Wentworth Street since the 1830's will remain a house of worship. A bid to sell the church, and turn it into a private home, was all but approved recently by Charleston's board of zoning and appeals.

      Tuesday, that final decision was taken out of the city's hands.

      The Redeemer Presbyterian Church has held service at St. Andrews Lutheran for more than five years. St. Andrews owns the church on Wentworth. The Redeemer congregation had been leasing the space. But a plan to sell it, so it can be turned into a home, a neighboring building into offices, put the sanctuary in jeopardy.

      "I think Charleston needs not only shells of buildings, but buildings that are alive with a vibrancy," said Redeemer Presbyterian Assistant Pastor, Sam Joyner.

      Joyner says his congregation is full of young families. They come to worship weekly with commitment and energy.

      "Doors open at 12 o'clock, and children bursting out, and music spilling out onto the street, people leaving here with hope in their eyes," said Joyner.

      The city council was to rule on a decision made by the city's board of zoning that had nearly given the go-ahead for the church to be changed.

      "It's special to us, because we meet here every single week," Joyner said. "We have our children baptized, marriages occur, funerals occur."

      Businesswoman Nancy Snowden had offered to buy the property and renovate it. According to Redeemer, Snowden's bid was just south of $2 million. Snowden refused a request to comment for this report.

      Meantime, Redeemer Presbyterian was hopeful it could work out a way to stay at 43 Wentworth. The congregation did not have a plan B, had the sale gone through. But if they were forced to move, they'd be sure to carry on.

      "If he (God) wants to move us on, we'll believe his plan is big enough to include relocating, and he'll bless us there," said Joyner

      According to city council members, Tuesday, St. Andrews Lutheran and Redeemer Presbyterian have agreed to negotiate a deal that would sell the church to Redeemer, in the coming months.

      decision was taken out of the city's hands. {}

      The Redeemer Presbyterian Church has held service here at St. Andrews Lutheran for more than five years. St. Andrews owns the church on Wentworth. The Redeemer congregation had been leasing the space. But a plan to sell it, so it can be turned into a home, a neighboring building into offices, put the sanctuary in jeopardy.

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      "I think Charleston needs not only shells of buildings, but buildings that are alive with a vibrancy," said Redeemer Presbyterian Assistant Pastor, Sam Joyner.

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      Joyner says his congregation is full of young families. They come to worship weekly with commitment and energy.

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      "Doors open at 12 o'clock, and children bursting out, and music spilling out onto the street, people leaving here with hope in their eyes," said Joyner.

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      The city council was to rule on a decision made by the city's board of zoning that had nearly given the go ahead for the church to be changed.

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      "It's special to us, because we meet here every single week," Joyner said. "We have our children baptized, marriages occur, funerals occur."

      {}

      Businesswoman Nancy Snowden had offered to buy the property and renovate it. According to Redeemer, Snowden's bid was just south of $2 million. Snowden refused a request to comment for this report.

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      Meantime, Redeemer Presbyterian was hopeful it could work out a way

      A Holy City church that's stood on Wentworth Street since the 1830's will remain a house of worship. A bid to sell the church, and turn it into a private home, was all but approved recently by Charleston's board of zoning and appeals.

      Tuesday, that final decision was taken out of the city's hands.

      The Redeemer Presbyterian Church has held service here at St. Andrews Lutheran for more than five years. St. Andrews owns the church on Wentworth. The Redeemer congregation had been leasing the space. But a plan to sell it, so it can be turned into a home, a neighboring building into offices, put the sanctuary in jeopardy.

      "I think Charleston needs not only shells of buildings, but buildings that are alive with a vibrancy," said Redeemer Presbyterian Assistant Pastor, Sam Joyner.

      Joyner says his congregation is full of young families. They come to worship weekly with commitment and energy.

      "Doors open at 12 o'clock, and children bursting out, and music spilling out onto the street, people leaving here with hope in their eyes," said Joyner.

      The city council was to rule on a decision made by the city's board of zoning that had nearly given the go ahead for the church to be changed.

      "It's special to us, because we meet here every single week," Joyner said. "We have our children baptized, marriages occur, funerals occur."

      Businesswoman Nancy Snowden had offered to buy the property and renovate it. According to Redeemer, Snowden's bid was just south of $2 million. Snowden refused a request to comment for this report.

      Meantime, Redeemer Presbyterian was hopeful it could work out a way to stay at 43 Wentworth.

      The congregation did not have a plan B, had the sale gone through. But if they were forced to move, they'd be sure to carry on.

      "If he (God) wants to move us on, we'll believe his plan is big enough to include relocating, and he'll bless us there," said Joyner

      According to city council members, Tuesday, St. Andrews Lutheran and Redeemer Presbyterian have agreed to negotiate a deal that would sell the church to Redeemer, in the coming months.

      to stay at 43 Wentworth.

      The congregation did not have a plan B, had the sale gone through. But if they were forced to move, they'd be sure to carry on.

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      "If he (God) wants to move us on, we'll believe his plan is big enough to include relocating, and he'll bless us there," said Joyner

      {}

      According to city council members, Tuesday, St. Andrews Lutheran and Redeemer Presbyterian have agreed to negotiate a deal that would sell the church to Redeemer, in the coming months.

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      By Eric Egan

      eegan@abcnews4.com

      CHARLESTON, SC (WCIV) -- A Holy City church that's stood on Wentworth Street since the 1830's will remain a house of worship. A bid to sell the church, and turn it into a private home, was all but approved recently by Charleston's board of zoning and appeals.

      Tuesday, that final decision was taken out of the city's hands.

      The Redeemer Presbyterian Church has held service at St. Andrews Lutheran for more than five years. St. Andrews owns the church on Wentworth. The Redeemer congregation had been leasing the space. But a plan to sell it, so it can be turned into a home, a neighboring building into offices, put the sanctuary in jeopardy.

      "I think Charleston needs not only shells of buildings, but buildings that are alive with a vibrancy," said Redeemer Presbyterian Assistant Pastor, Sam Joyner.

      Joyner says his congregation is full of young families. They come to worship weekly with commitment and energy.

      "Doors open at 12 o'clock, and children bursting out, and music spilling out onto the street, people leaving here with hope in their eyes," said Joyner.

      The city council was to rule on a decision made by the city's board of zoning that had nearly given the go-ahead for the church to be changed.

      "It's special to us, because we meet here every single week," Joyner said. "We have our children baptized, marriages occur, funerals occur."

      Businesswoman Nancy Snowden had offered to buy the property and renovate it. According to Redeemer, Snowden's bid was just south of $2 million. Snowden refused a request to comment for this report.

      Meantime, Redeemer Presbyterian was hopeful it could work out a way to stay at 43 Wentworth. The congregation did not have a plan B, had the sale gone through. But if they were forced to move, they'd be sure to carry on.

      "If he (God) wants to move us on, we'll believe his plan is big enough to include relocating, and he'll bless us there," said Joyner

      According to city council members, Tuesday, St. Andrews Lutheran and Redeemer Presbyterian have agreed to negotiate a deal that would sell the church to Redeemer, in the coming months.

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