Haircuts at the Hospital: Helping Cancer Patients

      (Joe O'Neill/WCIV)

      By Stacy

      WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCIV) -- Jeanette Kaminsky is a cosmetologist. But, she doesn't just work at your neighborhood salon.

      Instead, she works at Roper St. Francis Hospital in the Healing Boutique.

      "Using my skills incorporated with Roper, together we try to help people as far as feeling better about themselves, going through such a tough time," Kaminsky said.

      She gave haircuts for $18 Wednesday, with $10 benefiting "Look Good Feel Better." The American Cancer Society{}program pairs Kaminsky with patients. Together, they go over makeup, hair and other beauty routines.

      She hopes the program{}makes a rough time a little easier.

      "The hair loss and wigs - we go over different ways to cope with that: different wigs that are available, different ways of tying scarves, how to put the wig on (and) how to care for the wig," she said.

      Haircuts weren't the only way the Healing Boutique helped out cancer patients. It also has a unique bra-fitting room for women who are getting prosthetics and offers products that are vital resources for both men and women.

      "We're here to help cancer patients on their journey," Mary Ann Ward said.

      The shop is unique in the Lowcountry, Ward said. It has hard-to-find{}products like lotions for patients undergoing radiation. But sometimes, it's the little things - like a mug with a pink-ribbon message, or a new undergarment.

      "Sometimes when they come in for a fitting, you can see the difference when the woman walks out," Ward said.{}"She's had a fitting, she has a prosthesis, and it's a whole other person who walks out the door. So it's very rewarding to see someone's life has been changed back to what it should be."

      If you need help or would like to get involved with Look Good Feel Better, contact the American Cancer Society.{}You{}can reach the Charleston location at 843-958-0930 and the North Charleston location at 304-744-1922.

      Kaminsky also{}said the American Cancer Society{}will provide wigs to patients who cannot afford them.