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So you bought a generator for Hurricane Irma? Here's what you need to know:

(WCIV)

A truckload of generators arrived at West Ashley Hardware on Friday, and owner Waylon Cain said many customers already called ahead to place orders for them.

“As with any hardware store in a natural disaster it's busy,” he said. “We're just getting the product to the customer as we take it off the truck.”

Gavert Hollings stopped by the neighborhood store for one of the generators to make sure his West Ashley home was prepared for Hurricane Irma.

(TRACK HURRICANE IRMA | CLICK HERE)

“I know that they come in handy with storms that we're being threatened with,” he said.

Hollings ran a generator for three weeks during Hurricane Hugo in 1989, so we checked to see if he knew the correct safety measures to take when using a portable generator.

“Run them outside your house,” he said first.

(SEE HURRICANE IRMA RELATED CLOSINGS | CLICK HERE)

Cain agreed, saying that’s the most important rule.

“A lot of people who may not have used them before try to put them in the garage,” he said. That is still not safe.”

Cain also said to make sure you have the right wattage extension cords and don’t make your generator work too hard.

(SEE MORE HURRICANE STORIES | CLICK HERE)

“Don’t overload your generator,” he said. “A lot of people will try to put a fridge, hot water heater, and a freezer at the same time. Only have on it what you're using at that time. It's not only safe, but it increases your gas mileage on your generator.”

Cain also warned against trying to directly wire a generator into your home without the help of an electrician.

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