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West Ashley flooding study calls for $44M fix, possibly buying more flood-prone homes

(File/WCIV)

Monday night, the City of Charleston learned it will take more than $44 Million to fix flooding issues in parts of the city. That’s according to findings of a drainage study on West Ashley’s Church Creek Basin.

During Monday night's City Council meeting, a representative from Weston and Sampson Engineering, the firm that conducted the study, laid out the expensive bill.

Engineers cited over-development as one of the primary causes of ongoing flooding problems in the Church Creek Basin.

Several heavily populated subdivisions along Bees Ferry Road and Ashley River Road lie within the basin, and engineers say Church Creek, which flows into the Ashley River, isn't capable of handling storm runoff.

For solutions, engineers recommended buying more flood prone homes and properties, a solution the city is already pursuing in the Bridgepointe Town Homes portion of Shadow Moss.

Another suggestion was pumping stations on the creek near Bees Ferry Road.

People from all over the city of Charleston filled the meeting Monday.

Bob Habig doesn't live in the Church Creek Basin, but flooding still has been an ongoing problem for him at his home on Savage Road.

Habig moved to the Holy City three years ago. His historic home is his dream, but floodwaters are turning it into a nightmare.

“Is it going to happen next year? God I hope not. It was heartbreaking watching the storm water come into the house,” Habig said of the flooding.

In hopes of a solution, he attended Monday’s City Council Meeting. Of the proposed $44 million it will cost to alleviate the flood issues in West Ashley and parts of downtown, Habig says he doesn’t think the price is too high to preserve the Holy City.

“If we don’t address the storm issue, the flood water issue, we’re going to taint the reputation of Charleston,” Habig said. “With the growth we’ve experienced and the amount of development, not making a sizable investment in that type of infrastructure is crazy, it’s just crazy.”


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